Totality

It was an extraordinary experience photographing a full solar eclipse as central Nebraska was one of 10 states in the centerline of totality. A group of four photographers consisting of three newspaper staffers and a freelancer all had specific assignments. Mine was in the small town of Dannebrog at Liberty Range. I met people not only from Nebraska, but from Minnesota, Texas and even Germany. There were activities associated with the eclipse that also plays into what Nebraska life is like. As perhaps a once in a lifetime experience it was quite a spectacle to observe.

Sunlight shimmers around the sphere of the moon during a two and a half minute totality of a solar eclipse at Liberty Range in Dannebrog, Neb.

Sunlight shimmers around the sphere of the moon during a two and a half minute totality of a solar eclipse at Liberty Range in Dannebrog, Neb. Photograph was taken with a Canon EOS 1DX Mark II camera body and a 300mm f2.8 lens with a 1.4x converter. Exposure was 1/1,000th of a second at f5.6 at 1600 ISO.

Roger Grim, a member of the United Nebraska Muzzle Loaders Association, holds a .45 caliber Lincoln Derringer gun with Cipher King of Omaha while shooting at a target of the moon at Liberty Range in Dannebrog, Neb. Monday. Target shooting was one of the activities prior to watching a full solar eclipse as Nebraska was one of 10 states to witness this rare event.

Roger Grim, a member of the United Nebraska Muzzle Loaders Association, holds a .45 caliber Lincoln Derringer gun with Cipher King of Omaha while shooting at a target of the moon at Liberty Range in Dannebrog, Neb. Monday. Target shooting was one of the activities prior to watching a full solar eclipse as Nebraska was one of 10 states to witness this rare event.

Eden Connelly of Omaha throws a tomahawk at a target prior to viewing the solar eclipse at Liberty Range in Dannebrog, Neb. Monday.

Eden Connelly of Omaha throws a tomahawk at a target prior to viewing the solar eclipse at Liberty Range in Dannebrog, Neb. Monday.

J Gordan Christensen of Council Bluffs, Iowa looks through a pair of solar glasses as the eclipse starts at Liberty Range in Dannebrog, Neb. Monday. Christensen is originally from Nebraska and is a 1961 graduate of Dannebrog High School.

J Gordan Christensen of Council Bluffs, Iowa looks through a pair of solar glasses as the eclipse starts at Liberty Range in Dannebrog, Neb. Monday. Christensen is originally from Nebraska and is a 1961 graduate of Dannebrog High School.

As the solar eclipse begins Noah Abdullahi from the twin cities area of Minnesota lays back on bleachers to observe at Liberty Range in Dannebrog, Neb. Monday.

As the solar eclipse begins Noah Abdullahi from the twin cities area of Minnesota lays back on bleachers to observe at Liberty Range in Dannebrog, Neb. Monday.

Rosie Lensing of Mounds View, Minn. holds a colander that shows a shadow of half-moons onto a piece of cardboard during a full solar eclipse Monday at Liberty Range in Dannebrog.

 

An eclipse sign leads the way to Liberty Range on Liberty Rd. in Dannebrog, Neb. Monday.

An eclipse sign leads the way to Liberty Range on Liberty Rd. in Dannebrog, Neb. Monday.

Phoenix Grim of Omaha wears a makeshift mask including a paper plate and head band with her solar glasses at Liberty Range in Dannebrog, Neb. Monday.

Phoenix Grim of Omaha wears a makeshift mask including a paper plate and head band with her solar glasses at Liberty Range in Dannebrog, Neb. Monday.

Marti Lucking holds a pair of solar glasses for her husband Fred to take a picture through at Liberty Range in Dannebrog, Neb. Monday. And Thomas Helmsfaedt with his girlfriend Sibylle Mackeldey of Berlin, Germany sit on a bench behind the Luckings.

Marti Lucking holds a pair of solar glasses for her husband Fred to take a picture through at Liberty Range in Dannebrog, Neb. Monday. And Thomas Helmsfaedt with his girlfriend Sibylle Mackeldey of Berlin, Germany sit on a bench behind the Luckings.

Barrett Stinson, photo editor at The Grand Island Independent, uses three boxes to prop up a tripod to photograph a solar eclipse with a Canon EOS 1D Mark II with a 200-400 zoom lens with a built in 1.4x converter and a second 1.4x converter attached. Taking photos approximatley every six minutes throughout the duration of the eclipse outside the newspaper office.

Barrett Stinson, photo editor at The Grand Island Independent, uses three boxes to prop up a tripod to photograph a solar eclipse with a Canon EOS 1DX Mark II with a 200-400 zoom lens with a built in 1.4x converter and a second 1.4x converter attached. Taking photos approximatley every six minutes throughout the duration of the eclipse outside the newspaper office.

A diamond ring appears on the top right as pearls of sunlight shining through valleys and mountains of the moon called Bailey’s beads shimmer during totality of a solar eclipse spanning across 10 states as viewed at Liberty Range in Dannebrog, Neb.

A diamond ring appears on the top right as pearls of sunlight shining through valleys and mountains of the moon called Bailey’s beads shimmer during totality of a solar eclipse spanning across 10 states as viewed at Liberty Range in Dannebrog, Neb.

Comments are closed.